.

Early Van Zandt Unearthed

First recordings by Texas songwriter due in April

January 29, 2003 12:00 AM ET

The earliest known recordings by late Texas songwriting legend Townes Van Zandt have been unearthed and will be released as In the Beginning by Compadre Records on April 22nd.

The ten-song collection features demos recorded by Van Zandt in 1966 after fellow Texas songwriter Mickey Newbury urged him to move from the club circuit in Houston to Nashville. The songs on Beginning were recorded two years before the release of his first album, For the Sake of the Song (later retitled First Album). The songs, which feature Van Zandt both unaccompanied and backed by a band, were thought to be lost for years. His widow, Jeanene Van Zandt, said that he told her about the recordings, and while she had lyrics for the songs, the tapes weren't found until recently by Jack Clement, his first publisher and old friend.

The recordings capture Van Zandt just two years after he quit college to pursue what would become a romanticized thirty-year career as a hard-living, rambling, gambling poet and songwriter. Van Zandt died of a heart attack in 1997. His stark yet beautiful songs have made him a cult favorite in the Seventies and inspired his own and the subsequent generation of songwriters -- from country rock maverick Steve Earle to Emmylou Harris (who had a hit cover of Van Zandt's "If I Needed You") to the Cowboy Junkies, who toured with Van Zandt in the early Nineties.

"He influenced everything I do," Earle said last year. "Anytime I'm playing an acoustic guitar, it's real obvious how those he influenced my playing and my approach to songwriting and performing. Those guys made a huge imprint there, and I'll never escape it, and I don't really want to."

According to Junkies' guitarist/songwriter Michael Timmons, the band has been toying with the idea of covering an entire album of his songs. "The songs are so powerful lyrically that you can do them in a lot of different ways," he says. "The hard part is that there's so many songs to choose from with Townes. His ballads are beautiful."

While Van Zandt would occasionally recycle music in the late Sixties and early Seventies, recording songs in different formats for different albums, the ten songs on In the Beginning are largely represented for the first time on this collection, save "Waitin' for the Day," which appeared in a different format on an import-only Van Zandt box set.

In other Van Zandt news, reissues of four of his late Sixties/early Seventies recordings for Tomato Records -- 1968's For the Sake of the Song/First Album, 1969's Our Mother the Mountain, 1971's Delta Momma Blues and 1978's Flyin' Shoes -- are due later this winter.

Track listing for In the Beginning:

Black Widow Blues
Maryetta's Song
Hunger Child Blues
Gypsy Friday
Waitin' for the Day
Black Jack Mama
When Your Dream Lovers Die
Colorado Bound
Big Country Blues
Black Crow Blues

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Bird on a Wire”

Leonard Cohen | 1969

While living on the Greek island of Hydra, Cohen was battling a lingering depression when his girlfriend handed him a guitar and suggested he play something. After spotting a bird on a telephone wire, Cohen wrote this prayer-like song of guilt. First recorded by Judy Collins, it would be performed numerous times by artists incuding Johnny Cash, Joe Cocker and Rita Coolidge. "I'm always knocked out when I hear my songs covered or used in some situation," Cohen told Rolling Stone. "I've never gotten over the fact that people out there like my music."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com