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E Street Keyboardist Danny Federici Returns, Springsteen Books Acoustic Show

March 21, 2008 10:35 AM ET

Last night E Street Band keyboardist Danny Federici — sidelined from the tour since last November as he recovers from melanoma — made a surprise appearance midway through the Bruce Springsteen show at the Canseco Fieldhouse in Indianapolis. The founding E Streeter played on "The Promised Land," "4th of July, Asbury Park" and "Spirit In The Night" during the main set and later returned to the stage for the five-song encore. Steve Van Zandt told Rolling Stone last week that Federici was doing great and his recovery had been "a bit miraculous." In other Springsteen news, he's playing a rare solo acoustic show at the Count Basie Theater in Red Bank New Jersey on May 7th. Tickets are available through an online auction with a minimum bid of $1,000. That may be a bit steep, but all proceeds benefit the theater, which hasn't been upgraded in over eighty years. Bids as high as $4,000 have already come in from as far as Italy and Scotland. The auction ends on April 2nd.

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Song Stories

“Bird on a Wire”

Leonard Cohen | 1969

While living on the Greek island of Hydra, Cohen was battling a lingering depression when his girlfriend handed him a guitar and suggested he play something. After spotting a bird on a telephone wire, Cohen wrote this prayer-like song of guilt. First recorded by Judy Collins, it would be performed numerous times by artists incuding Johnny Cash, Joe Cocker and Rita Coolidge. "I'm always knocked out when I hear my songs covered or used in some situation," Cohen told Rolling Stone. "I've never gotten over the fact that people out there like my music."

More Song Stories entries »
 
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