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DVD Review: Mumford & Sons' 'The Big Easy Express'

The Britfolkers teamed up with Edward Sharpe and Old Crow Medicine Show for a railroad tour – then they released a documentary about it

Giles Dunning, Tim Lynch, Emmett Malloy, Mike Luba, Gill Landry, Alex Ebert, Marcus Mumford and Bryan Ling attend Big Easy Express Red Carpet during the 2012 SXSW Music Festival at Paramount Theatre on March 17th, 2012 in Austin, Texas.
Michael Buckner/Getty
August 2, 2012

DVDS
The Big Easy Express
S2BN Films
* * * 1/2

Last year, Mumford & Sons, Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros, and Old Crow Medicine Show toured from Oakland to New Orleans, riding only in vintage trains. Filmmaker Emmett Malloy documented the nonstop locomotive jam on- and offstage. Sharpe and his Zeros perform amid desert brush near the Mexican border; the Mumfords jam with the Austin High School Marching Band; and the tour ends with members of all three bands wailing together on the gospel standard "This Train Is Bound for Glory" so joyfully that they collapse onto the stage.

This review is from the August 2nd, 2012 issue of Rolling Stone.



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