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Duane Allman Celebrated With Massive Box Set

Seven-disc collection includes 129 songs, liner notes from daughter Galadrielle

Concord Music Group/Rounder Records
January 25, 2013 1:05 PM ET

Duane Allman, one of rock's all-time greats, will get a fitting tribute to his legacy on March 5th when Rounder Records releases a comprehensive seven-disc box set. Curated and produced by Bill Levenson and Allman's daughter Galadrielle, Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective spans the guitarist's too-short career.

100 Greatest Guitarists: Duane Allman

The 129-song compilation featuring recordings from Allman's early garage-rock days in the Allman Joys, the Escorts and the Hour Glass; studio sessions with Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett, Boz Scaggs, Clarence Carter and more; and, of course, selections from the Allman Brothers Band and his work with Derek and the Dominoes.

The collection features liner notes from Rolling Stone's Alt-Rock-A-Rama author Scott Schinder, plus additional notes from Galadrielle Allman. The Allman Brothers had begun recording Eat a Peach, the follow-up to their classic At Fillmore East, shortly before Duane Allman died in a motorcycle crash on October 29th, 1971. He was 24. 

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