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Dropkick Murphys Feature Bruce Springsteen on Charity EP

Proceeds will benefit victims of the Boston Marathon bombings

May 16, 2013 8:15 AM ET
Dropkick Murphys featuring Bruce Springsteen, 'Rose Tattoo'
Dropkick Murphys featuring Bruce Springsteen, 'Rose Tattoo'
Courtesy of Hellcat Records

Bruce Springsteen and the Dropkick Murphys have teamed up on an EP to benefit victims of the Boston Marathon bombings. The three-song EP, available now through iTunes, features Springsteen's vocals on a new version of the Dropkick Murphys song' "Rose Tattoo," along with live acoustic versions of "Don't Tear Us Apart" and "Jimmy Collins's Wake," which the band recorded live in Las Vegas just four days after the April 15th terrorist attack.

Dropkick Murphys Raise $65,000 for Boston Bombing Victims

The EP, Rose Tattoo: For Boston Charity, is out now on iTunes for $1.29, with all proceeds going to bombing victims through the Dropkick Murphys' Claddagh Fund, a registered non-profit the band established to "serve the most vulnerable in our communities." 

"Innocent people being hurt by terrorists fits the core of that mission, and we're proud to be able to help," the band said in a statement on their website. The group has already raised more than $65,000 for victims of the bombings.

Springsteen has collaborated with the Dropkick Murphys before, lending his voice to "Peg o' My Heart" from their 2011 album Going Out in Style, and appearing with the Boston rockers onstage.

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Song Stories

“Long Walk Home”

Bruce Springsteen | 2007

When the subject of this mournful song returns home, he hardly recognizes his town. Springsteen told Rolling Stone the alienation the man feels is a metaphor for life in a politically altered post-9/11 America. “Who would have ever thought we’d live in a country without habeas corpus?” he said. “That’s Orwellian. That’s what political hysteria is about and how effective it is. I felt it in myself. You get frightened for your family, for your home. And you realize how countries can move way off course, very far from democratic ideals.”

More Song Stories entries »
 
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