.

Drake Chastises Walgreens, Macy's Over Use of 'YOLO'

'Either chill or cut the cheque,' the singer writes online

Drake in Indianapolis, Indiana.
Johnny Nunez/WireImage
December 27, 2012 9:30 AM ET

You only live once, but royalty payments are forever: Drake has chastised Walgreens and Macy's on Instagram for selling clothing emblazoned with "YOLO." "Walgreens . . . you gotta either chill or cut the cheque," the Canadian singer and rapper wrote underneath a photo of baseball caps with "YOLO" printed on them. "Macy's . . . same goes for you," he wrote under another photo of a t-shirt that pictures Charlie Brown and Snoopy and the words "YOLO is my motto."

Drake Delivers High School Graduation Speech

It was Drake's motto, too, on a collaborative 2011 mixtape by that name with Rick Ross. "YOLO" was also a lyric in the Take Care bonus track "The Motto," where Drake rapped, "You only live once n*gga YOLO." 

Although Drake helped popularize YOLO, he didn't invent it: the phrase popped up on the NBC reality show The Average Joe in 2004, and Average Joe star Adam Mesh launched a YOLO clothing line the same year.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Road to Nowhere”

Talking Heads | 1985

A cappella harmonies give way to an a fuller arrangement blending pop and electro-disco on "Road to Nowhere," but the theme remains constant: We're on an eternal journey to an undefined destination. The song vaulted back into the news a quarter century after it was a hit when Gov. Charlie Crist used it in his unsuccessful 2010 campaign for the U.S. Senate in Florida. "It's this little ditty about how there's no order and no plan and no scheme to life and death and it doesn't mean anything, but it's all right," Byrne said with a chuckle.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com