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Dough Rollers Lament Lost Lovers on 'Gone Baby Gone' - Premiere

Check out the new track from this rising NYC band

Dough Rollers
Emily Hope
February 14, 2014 8:00 AM ET

New York City's Dough Rollers play hard blues tailored for Jack White – he was impressed enough that his label, Third Man Records, released their 2013 single "Little Lily." On the band's new track "Gone Baby Gone," the quartet continue building on that original sound with soul-drenched despair, where vocalist Malcolm Ford laments the loss of a lover alongside guitarist Jack Bryne's cold, bending riffs.

 See Where Jack White Ranks on Our 100 Greatest Guitarists

Despite the noticably loose feel that "Gone Baby Gone" evokes, the band worked on many versions until they got it just right. "[It's] like a distant relative to the song we were rehearsing before we went into the studio," the band told Rolling Stone. "It really transformed into something with a totally different character after we sat with it for a while and kept stripping it down and re-layering it. It became almost a whole new song."

The Dough Rollers new EP will be released sometime this spring via on Third Man Records.

Stream "Gone Baby Gone" below:

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