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Doctor Defends Propofol at Conrad Murray Trial

Expert says sedative that killed Michael Jackson is fine when used properly

October 19, 2011 4:20 PM ET
Dr. Conrad Murray sits at the defense table with attorney J. Michael Flanagan
Dr. Conrad Murray sits at the defense table with attorney J. Michael Flanagan
Mario Anzuoni-Pool/Getty Images

An authority on the drug propofol testified at the trial of Michael Jackson's physician, Dr. Conrad Murray, today. Dr. Steven Shafer, a leading researcher on the use of the sedative, claimed that the drug has developed a bad reputation since it was connected to the pop star's death in 2009. According to Shafer, propofol is an "outstanding drug" when administered properly and not used as a sleep aid, as Jackson had used it under the care of Murray.

Dr. Shafer is expected to be the final witness called by the prosecution in the trial. According to Shafer, he testified without being paid out of a desire to restore patients' faith in the drug. "I am asked every day I'm in the operating room – I tell patients what I'm going to do and I am asked the question, 'Are you going to give me the drug that killed Michael Jackson?'," he told jurors this morning.

Related
Timeline: The Trial of Dr. Conrad Murray
Photos: Michael Jackson Remembered
Photos: Michael Jackson's Funeral

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