.

DMX Hangs onto to No. 1 Spot on the Charts

January 7, 1999 12:00 AM ET

It's back to reality at the nation's record stores as the post-holiday sales lull takes hold. There's not one new record in the top 150, and only the two-week-old soundtrack to The Faculty, featuring the remake of Pink Floyd's "Another Brick in the Wall," actually increased sales over the previous week. Not that there wasn't lots of jockeying for chart position, it was just a question of which artists' sales decreases were the smallest. The answer: Rap artists, that's who.

For the second straight week, New York rapper DMX had no trouble hanging on to the No. 1 album in the country, according to SoundScan. For the week ending Jan. 3, DMX's second album in less than a year, Flesh of My Flesh, Blood of My Blood, sold 248,000 copies. (Breaking with industry tradition, which says new albums cannot be released just days before Christmas because they'll get lost in the shuffle, DMX's latest, released three days before Christmas, has sold 918,000 copies in two weeks. So much for tradition.)

But even DMX's sales were off sixty-three percent compared to last week's steroid numbers, when forty-six different albums broke the 100,000 sales mark. This week, just twelve managed that magic number. Still, certain acts are clearly connecting with fans and climbing the charts, including the Offspring (who jump from No. 8 to No. 2), Jay-Z (10 to 3), Tupac (11 to 6), Busta Rhymes (21 to 12), R. Kelly (31 to 19), Outkast (56 to 37), Limp Bizkit (55 to 39) and Ice Cube (83 to 48).

From the top, it was DMX, followed by the Offspring's Americana (selling 174,000 copies), Jay-Z's Vol. II: Hard Knock Life (170,000); Mariah Carey's No. 1's (162,000); 'N Sync (161,000); Tupac's Greatest Hits (152,000); Garth Brooks' Double Live (148,000); Jewel's Spirit (146,000); The Backstreet Boys (114,000) and Lauryn Hill's The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill (113,000).

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Santa Monica”

Everclear | 1996

After his brother and girlfriend both died of drug overdoses, Art Alexakis -- depressed and hooked on drugs himself -- jumped off the Santa Monica Pier in California, determined to die. "It was really stupid," said the Everclear frontman, who would further explore his personal emotional journey in the song "Father of Mine." "I went under the water. Then I said, 'I don't wanna die.'" The song, declaring "Let's swim out past the breakers/and watch the world die," was intended as a manifesto for change, Alexakis said. "Let the world do what it's gonna do and just live on our own."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com