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Disturbed, Bon Jovi Rule the Chart

Chicago metal band snags second consecutive chart-topper

September 28, 2005 12:00 AM ET

Disturbed top the chart this week, after moving 239,000 copies of their third effort, Ten Thousand Fists, according to Nielsen SoundScan. This is the Chicago metal band's second consecutive Number One album: 2002's Believe moved 284,000 CDs to dominate. In second place are Bon Jovi, whose Have a Nice Day sold 202,000 units. The veteran New Jersery rockers' last studio album, 2002's Bounce, also opened at Number Two.

Hip-hop superstar Kanye West's sophomore effort, Late Registration, now down one spot to Number Three, moved another 126,000 copies to add to its well-over-1-million tally. And at Number Four (104,000) is the new compilation, So Amazing: An All-Star Tribute to Luther Vandross, which features covers of the recently deceased soul legend's classics by Beyonce, Usher, Jamie Foxx, John Legend and Babyface.

Rounding out the Top Five is funny girl Barbra Streisand's second collaboration with Bee Gees frontman Barry Gibb, Guilty Pleasures. (The first was 1980's chart-topper, Guilty.) Gibb wrote and produced much of the album of mainstream pop, even playing guitar on a few tracks.

On the hip-hop front, Dirty South rapper David Banner's latest, Certified, sold 89,000 copies to come in at Number Six, his highest album chart debut ever. (2003's Mississippi: The Album landed at Number Nine.) But alt-metal act Coheed and Cambria had a true breakthrough with their second effort: the epically titled Good Apollo, I'm Burning Star IV, Volume One: From Fear Through the Eyes of Madness sold 84,000 CDs to land at Number Seven, forty-five places ahead of 2003'sIn Keeping Secrets of Silent Earth: 3.

While chart mainstay Black Eyed Peas' Monkey Business held at Number Eight (82,000), pop diva Mariah Carey's Emancipation of Mimi shockingly dropped out after months in the Top Ten, landing at Number Eleven (61,000).

Houston MC Paul Wall's major-label debut, The People's Champ, last week's Number One, dropped eight places to Number Nine (70,000). And the debut from rapper T.I.'s Atlanta crew P$C (a.k.a. Pimp Squad Click), 25 to Life, busted in at Ten (62,000).

While Paul McCartney's thirteenth solo studio album -- and his most stripped-down effort in years -- Chaos and Creation in the Backyard fell ten places in its second week to a respectable Number Sixteen (49,000), others experienced a more dramatic drop. Christian alt-rockers Switchfoot's fifth album, Nothing Is Sound, fell from a career-high Number Three debut to Number Eighteen (46,000) in just its second week out. Similarly, country crossover Trisha Yearwood's tenth studio album, Jasper County, fell sixteen places to Number Twenty (43,000). And Bob Marley's son Damian saw his debut, Welcome to Jamrock, drop fifteen spots to Number Twenty-Two (42,000).

Next week, watch out for the return of Sheryl Crow, with the much-hyped release of her fifth studio album, Wildflower. And tough-talking country gal Gretchen Wilson's latest, All Jacked Up, is sure to ride the success of "Redneck Woman" a long ways up the chart.

This week's Top Ten: Disturbed's Ten Thousand Fists; Bon Jovi's Have a Nice Day; Kanye West's Late Registration; So Amazing: An All-Star Tribute to Luther Vandross; Barbra Streisand's Guilty Pleasures; David Banner's Certified; Coheed and Cambria's Good Apollo, I'm Burning Star IV, Volume One: From Fear Through the Eyes of Madness; Black Eyed Peas' Monkey Business; Paul Wall's The People's Champ; P$C's 25 to Life.

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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