.

Disney Look to Become Guitar Heroes With "Ultimate Band"

February 27, 2008 4:07 PM ET

Disney will attempt to enter the Guitar Hero/Rock Band arena with Ultimate Band, a new video game for Nintendo's Wii and DS systems. Unlike Guitar Hero and Rock Band, the Disney Interactive Studios-produced Ultimate Band will not require the purchase of fake instruments, instead relying on normal controllers to simulate jamming. Players will also be able to create their own tunes by "laying down tracks for each instrument and applying creative mixing effects." Clearly, Disney has been inspired by the rousing success of music-based games (the Guitar Hero franchise has grossed over $1 billion by itself) and have already dabbled in them (they had recent hits with High School Musical-based singing games). No release date has been set for Ultimate Band, nor have any in-game songs been announced.

Related Stories:
The Jonas Brothers at the Center of Alleged Disney/EMI Fight
What Other Rides Will Disney's "American Idol" Attraction Spawn?
"High School Musical 2" Soundtrack Sets Record For Worst Best-Seller Ever

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“San Francisco Mabel Joy”

Mickey Newbury | 1969

A country-folk song of epic proportions, "San Francisco Mabel Joy" tells the tale of a poor Georgia farmboy who wound up in prison after a move to the Bay Area found love turning into tragedy. First released by Mickey Newbury in 1969, it might be more familiar through covers by Waylon Jennings, Joan Baez and Kenny Rogers. "It was a five-minute song written in a two-minute world," Newbury said. "I was told it would never be cut by any artist ... I was told you could not use the term 'redneck' in a song and get it recorded."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com