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Def Leppard Consider Indie Status As Label Contract Ends

October 31, 2008 2:14 PM ET

After almost 30 years of major label success, Def Leppard are considering going the indie route. "For the last five or six years we haven't had the greatest of support from our record label," singer Joe Elliott told The Age. "We signed our contract in 1979, a lot of regimes ago. Once there was respect for what you'd done, but it's all just bean-counters now. I find that very sad." With their contract expiring and no major offers in sight, the band are considering going the same course as bands like Radiohead and Nine Inch Nails. "If Radiohead and the Eagles can go off and do it on their own, that's an acceptable yardstick to measure our own chances by," said Elliott. Radiohead enjoyed great success in this new frontier, the Eagles raked in the royalties from Long Road Out of Eden thanks to a deal with Wal-Mart. Elliott believes that Def Leppard has been around long enough that they no longer need the major label support, as their fanbase is firmly set. With no deal in place, Elliott says the band will seek a lucrative agreement for touring and online sales while recording as independent artists.

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Tour Preview: Def Leppard Admit "If You Play New Songs, The Audience Walks Out"
Radiohead Publishers Reveal In Rainbows Numbers
Nine Inch Nails, Eagles, Smashing Pumpkins: Who Needs Labels?

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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