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Dee Snider Rips Paul Ryan for Using 'We're Not Gonna Take It'

GOP played Twisted Sister hit at a campaign rally

August 22, 2012 12:45 PM ET
Dee Snider of Twisted Sister
Dee Snider of Twisted Sister
Shirlaine Forrest/WireImage

Rocker Dee Snider is unhappy with Republican vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan for using Twisted Sister's 1984 hit "We're Not Gonna Take It" as intro music at a rally yesterday in Pennsylvania, reports Talking Points Memo

"I emphatically denounce Paul Ryan's use of my band Twisted Sister's song, 'We're Not Gonna Take It,' in any capacity," Snider said. "There is almost nothing he stands for that I agree with except the use of the P90X."

Snider's not the first musician this year irate over Republicans' use of their songs: Just last week, Silversun Pickups told Mitt Romney to stop using their song "Panic Switch" at campaign events. Ryan recently expressed fondness for the music of Rage Against the Machine, prompting a pointed response from guitarist Tom Morello in a Rolling Stone op-ed.

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Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

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