.

Death of Chris Lighty Ruled a Suicide

Hip-hop executive died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head

Chris Lighty attends the Artist Managers From A - Z Event.
Joe Kohen/WireImage for NARAS
September 1, 2012 10:48 AM ET

New York City medical examiners have officially ruled the death of Chris Lighty a suicide, the Daily News reports. The influential hip-hop manager died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head on Thursday at the age of 44. 

Lighty was found dead in the back yard of his Bronx home, where he had reportedly been arguing with his estranged wife, Veronica Lighty. Veronica Lighty told the Daily News that her husband, who had made millions in endorsement deals for artists including 50 Cent, LL Cool J and Missy Elliot, was suffering from financial stress. Sources said he owed more than $300,000 to the IRS in unpaid state and federal taxes.

"He was in a lot of pain and he possibly had some financial difficulties," said family friend Norman Downes.

Lighty, whose clients included hip-hop and pop megastars like Busta Rhymes, Sean "Diddy" Combs and Mariah Carey, has been the subject of wide-ranging tributes among his music-industry peers in the days following his death.

"RIP Chris Lighty," Russell Simmons tweeted. "Today, we lost a hip-hop hero and one of its greatest architects..."

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Vans”

The Pack | 2006

Berkeley, California rappers the Pack made their footwear choice clear in 2006 with the song "Vans." The track caught the attention of Too $hort, who signed them to his imprint. MTV refused to play the video for the song, though, claiming it was essentially a commercial for the product. Rapper Lil' B disagreed. "I didn’t know nobody [at] Vans," he said. "I was just a rapper who wore Vans." Even without MTV's support, Lil' B recognized the impact of the track. "God blessed me with such a revolutionary song… People around my age know who really started a lot of the dressing people are into now."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com