Deadmau5 on EDM: 'It'll Eventually F--k Itself So Hard'

Electronic producer talks about the scene's coming demise, EDM festivals and his new LP

Deadmau5 performs
Gabriel Olsen/FilmMagic
Deadmau5 performs in Los Angeles, California.
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Deadmau5 is one of the most successful EDM artists (and brands) on the planet, but the beloved producer is losing respect for the scene he dominates. He makes that stance apparent in an expletive-laced new interview with London Evening Standard, likening the genre to a sinking ship.

“As they say, the rat is the first one to jump off the boat when it starts going down, and that’s kind of what’s happening," he says of the EDM trend currently dominating pop charts and festivals across the planet. "It’s already been going down the last couple of years, for me. Maybe not in the industry. Maybe there’ll be a whole new herd of sheep following that shit, and fucking good luck."

The Rise of Deadmau5

He even compares the genre to another once-trendy (and often bashed) genre: disco. 

"Disco had a longer run than EDM has, to be honest about it, and that died in a fucking hurry," he continues. "EDM is way more susceptible because that was in a time when they didn’t have mass social media and all that shit. It’s not gonna be me saying, ‘OK, EDM’s done,' and the whole thing falls apart, but I think it’ll eventually fuck itself so hard.”

The producer was in the mood to air grievances. Elsewhere, he unleashed some hate toward the American electronic fesival scene, claiming the artists who play them don't get enough credit.

“It’s another thing I can’t fucking stand, you know?" he says. "Festivals are being branded bigger than the acts, which is totally backwards in my head. It’s ’cause of those acts that you’re a festival! Who wins? The promoter. The guy who’s throwing this festival that’s branded bigger than you, that you think you’re awesome for headlining. It’s a shame, so that’s why I’m pulling out.”

The interview isn't all angry rants, though. Deadmau5 also talks about the surprising musical breadth of his upcoming seventh studio LP, While(1<2), which hits shelves June 17th. “The person who’s never heard my stuff before is hopefully gonna get surprised by the fact that it’s not just ‘dance’ music," he says.