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De La Soul Channel Wu-Tang Clan on 'Get Away' – Song Premiere

Hip-hop pioneers draw inspiration from harder-edged peers

De La Soul
Robbie Jefers
April 17, 2013 11:35 AM ET

De La Soul and the Wu-Tang Clan stand tall on any list of the most influential rap groups, and the former tapped into inspiration from the latter on their new track "Get Away (feat. the Spirit of the Wu)." Taking a different direction, the Long Island crew wraps words around a dark, spacey beat inspired by RZA's cabal, giving the hip-hop pioneers a sinister soundscape with disorienting weight.

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"I've always loved the 'Intro' on Disc Two of Wu-Tang Forever – this erie sample with no beat, that they only talked over," De La Soul's Posdnuos tells Rolling Stone. "I stumbled on the original sample while crate digging one day, took it straight to the lab and added drums. The feel is definitely gritty, hard and sounds like a Wu record, so out of inspirational respect, we included featuring 'The Spirit of the Wu' in the song title."

"Get Away" will be on De La Soul's forthcoming album, You're Welcome, due late fall.

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