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Dave Mustaine: I'm Not Ready to Endorse Rick Santorum

Megadeth frontman clarifies position on GOP presidential candidate

February 16, 2012 8:45 AM ET
dave mustaine
Dave Mustaine of Megadeth performs at the Aragon Ballroom in Chicago.
Daniel Boczarski/Getty Images

Megadeth rocker Dave Mustaine has clarified his position of support for Republic presidential candidate Rick Santorum, saying that he is not ready to give a full endorsement of the former Pennsylvania senator.

"Contrary to how some people have interpreted my words, I have not endorsed any presidential candidate," Mustaine said in a statement. "What I did say was that I hope to see a Republican in the White House. I've seen good qualities in all the candidates but by no means have made my choice yet. I respect the fact that Santorum took time off from his campaign to be with his sick daughter, but I never used the word 'endorse.'"

Mustaine told Music Radar that he is very unhappy with President Obama's term in the White House, and said that his support for Newt Gingrich has waned recently. "He's just gone back to being that person that everybody said he was – that angry little man," Mustaine said. "I still like him, but I don't think I'd vote for him."

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