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Dave Grohl, Taylor Hawkins to Induct Rush Into Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Don Henley will honor Randy Newman; Christina Aguilera and Jennifer Hudson will induct Donna Summer

Dave Grohl will induct Rush into Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
Jason Merritt/Getty Images; Gary Miller/FilmMagic
January 23, 2013 6:00 AM ET

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has announced the majority of the speakers for its 28th annual induction ceremony. Dave Grohl and Taylor Hawkins will induct Rush, Don Henley will induct Randy Newman, Jennifer Hudson and Christina Aguilera will team up to honor the late Donna Summer and John Mayer will induct the late Albert King

They have yet to announce who will induct Public Enemy or Ahmet Ertegun Award For Lifetime Achievement winners Lou Adler and Quincy Jones. A press release notes that "additional presenters and special guests will be announced at a later date."

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's Greatest Moments

For only the second time in its history, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony will be held in Los Angeles. Tickets go on sale to the public on February 1st, though members of the Rush and Heart fan clubs will be allowed to buy them earlier in a special pre-sale. 

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame ceremony will held on April 18th at the Nokia Theater L.A. Live. It will be broadcast on HBO on May 18th. 

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Song Stories

“San Francisco Mabel Joy”

Mickey Newbury | 1969

A country-folk song of epic proportions, "San Francisco Mabel Joy" tells the tale of a poor Georgia farmboy who wound up in prison after a move to the Bay Area found love turning into tragedy. First released by Mickey Newbury in 1969, it might be more familiar through covers by Waylon Jennings, Joan Baez and Kenny Rogers. "It was a five-minute song written in a two-minute world," Newbury said. "I was told it would never be cut by any artist ... I was told you could not use the term 'redneck' in a song and get it recorded."

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