.

Dan Toler, Former Allman Brothers Guitarist, Dead at 65

Musician battled Lou Gehrig's disease

Allman Brothers Band (l to r) Mike Lawler, Dave Goldflies, Gregg Allman, Butch Trucks, Dickey Betts, Dan Toler, and Dave Toler.
Photo by Everett Collection / Rex USA
February 25, 2013 4:45 PM ET

Guitarist Dan Toler, best known for his work with the Allman Brothers, died today in Manatee County, Florida, according to Ticket Sarasota. Toler had been battling ALS – also known as Lou Gehrig's disease – and was unable to play guitar or speak for his last few months. He was 65.

Toler joined the Dickey Betts and Great Southern band in the late Seventies and moved to the Allman Brothers with his brother David "Frankie" Toler and Betts. Toler played with the Allman Brothers on their 1979 comeback album Enlightened Rogues and was in the band for their next two records, 1980's Reach for the Sky and 1981's Brothers of the Road.

100 Greatest Artists: The Allman Brothers Band

Dan and Frankie Toler then spent much the 1980s playing with the Gregg Allman Band, touring and recording I'm No Angel in 1986 and Just Before the Bullets Fly in 1988. Toler rejoined Betts' Great Southern band in 2002 and later created the Townsend Toler Band with John Townsend. He then joined the Renegades of Southern Rock and wrapped his career with Toler Tucci Band, along with Chaz Trippy from the Gregg Allman Band.

After his brother's death in June 2011, Toler announced he had ALS that August. No funeral plans have been made yet.

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