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Daft Punk: 'Get Lucky' Sums Up 'Celebratory' Spirit of New Album

French dance duo open up on new track in rare radio interview

Daft Punk
Gregg DeGuire/FilmMagic
May 10, 2013 11:10 AM ET

Daft Punk sat down for a rare radio interview today with Australia's Triple J and dove into the creative process behind their new track "Get Lucky," as well as working with track collaborators Nile Rodgers and Pharrell. The French dance duo said the collaboration was symbolic of how their new album, Random Access Memories, came together.

Daft Punk's Most Revealing Interview Yet

"Like every song on this record, it was something really organic," Thomas Bangalter said. "They really represent bridging the generations together and what Nile Rodgers represents for dance music and R&B in America in the Seventies and the Eighties and what Pharrell represents from somehow the same genre of music in the Nineties and 2000s, it felt really interesting to connect all these eras together to create the music of the present and possibly the music of the future as well."

Daft Punk Reveal Secrets of New Album – Exclusive

The duo said that like "Get Lucky," their new album features a theme of celebration. "Probably because it was created in a really timeless bubble like that, it turned out to be a very optimistic record with very celebratory and optimistic lyrics," Bangalter said

Daft Punk hope the positive essence of Random Access Memories will arrive at the right time. "It's coming at a point, in a world that is not so optimistic and which is somehow, maybe more cynical and slightly pessimistic," he said.

Random Access Memories will be out May 21st.

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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