.

"Crawdaddy!" Founder Paul Williams Asks for Help

April 21, 2009 12:32 PM ET

In 1966 Paul Williams published his first issues of Crawdaddy! magazine, the first serious publication devoted to rock & roll news and criticism. In 1995, Williams suffered a brain injury in a bicycle accident near his California home. Today, the man who used to devour records and churn out copy requires managed care — as David Fricke reports in the current issue, Williams' accident brought on early onset Alzheimer's disease, and the pioneering writer has no insurance to cover the costs of his treatment.

To raise funds, Williams and his friends and family have launched a new Website, PaulWilliams.com, which is collecting donations and provides a striking retrospective of his life and career (he sang with John and Yoko on "Give Peace a Chance"). "He was like a friend leaning on your shoulder, saying 'You should check this out,' " R.E.M. guitarist Peter Buck tells Fricke. "And he always had smart reasons."

Williams started Crawdaddy! when he was a college student in Pennsylvania, and attracted fans like Bob Dylan and Paul Simon almost instantly. He edited the magazine until 1968, and began it again as a quarterly publication in the Nineties. Williams has published Bob Dylan: Performing Artist, a three-volume study of the singer-songwriter, and The Map, a 1988 book in which he wrote about the pleasures of listening to albums like R.E.M.'s Fables of the Reconstruction. "I thought, 'Now I'm part of this thing that changed people's lives,' " Bucks says of discovering his place in Williams' work. "Paul was part of it too."

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Nightshift”

The Commodores | 1984

The year after soul legends Marvin Gaye and Jackie Wilson died, songwriter Dennis Lambert asked members of the Commodores to give him a tape of ideas. "And the one from Walter Orange has this wonderful bass line," said co-writer Franne Golde. "Plus the lyric, 'Marvin, he was a friend of mine' ... Within 10 minutes, we had decided it should be something like a modern R&B version of 'Rock 'n' Roll Heaven,' and I just said, 'Nightshift.'" This tribute to the recently deceased musicians was the band's only hit without Lionel Richie, who had left for a solo career.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com