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Cover Contest Finalists Get Pumped Up For Bonnaroo Showdown

Lelia Broussard and the Sheepdogs indulge in smack talk before battle of the bands on June 11th

June 7, 2011 8:00 AM ET
Cover Contest Finalists Get Pumped Up For Bonnaroo Showdown
Photographs by Peter Yang

The final round of the Choose the Cover of Rolling Stone contest is under way! After over half a million votes were cast online, the 16 acts vying for the cover of Rolling Stone – as well as an Atlantic Records contract – have been narrowed down to two finalists: Canadian boogie rockers the Sheepdogs and Los Angeles singer-songwriter Lelia Broussard.

Choose Rolling Stone's Cover: The Sheepdogs vs. Lelia Broussard. Vote Now

The competition has been civil so far, but as Broussard and the 'Dogs enter the final phase of the contest, things are heating up. In this video, the bands get excited about playing a battle of the bands at the Bonnaroo festival on June 11th and indulge in a bit of smack talk. "Nobody wants to see a bunch of bearded, sweaty Canadian dudes on the cover of Rolling Stone," says Broussard. "Some of your influences are Alanis Morrissette, Feist, a couple nice Canadian artists?," Sheepdogs frontman Ewan Currie says, countering Broussard. "I've got another Canadian artist for you...the Sheepdogs! We're right here, we're gonna kick your ass!"

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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