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Coroner in Amy Winehouse Case Resigns

Investigation into her death could be reopened

February 1, 2012 4:30 PM ET
Amy Winehouse performs on the Main Stage at T in The Park in Balado, Kinrosshire, Scotland.
Amy Winehouse performs on the Main Stage at T in The Park in Balado, Kinrosshire, Scotland.
Ross Gilmore/Redferns

The coroner who conducted the inquest into the death of Amy Winehouse has resigned, raising the possibility that the case could be reopened. Assistant Deputy Coroner Suzanne Greenaway ruled in October that Winehouse, who was found dead on July 23rd, died of accidental alcohol poisoning. Greenaway resigned in November after officials discovered that she had not been a registered lawyer in the United Kingdom for the required five years. Her resignation was not made public until today.

Adding to the intrigue is the fact that Greenaway was appointed to her post by her husband, Andrew Reid, who serves as a London coroner himself. In a statement, Reid said that he was under the impression that his wife's tenure as a registered lawyer in her native Australia qualified her for the post. The Camden Council, the local authority in the matter, said it believed Reid "had made an error in good faith."

Reid indicated he would be willing to perform any of Greenaway's inquests again if the families of the deceased requested it. Winehouse's family said they are consulting with attorneys and have not yet decided whether to pursue a new inquest.

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