.

Conrad Murray Requests Publicly Funded Lawyer to Appeal Conviction

Doctor is serving prison term in connection with Michael Jackson's death

December 14, 2011 8:45 AM ET
Dr. Conrad Murray listens as he sits in court during his sentencing for the involuntary manslaughter of singer Michael Jackson.
Dr. Conrad Murray listens as he sits in court during his sentencing for the involuntary manslaughter of singer Michael Jackson.
Pool/Getty Images

Conrad Murray, the physician convicted of involuntary manslaughter in the death of Michael Jackson, has asked for a publicly funded lawyer to handle his appeal on that conviction, claiming that he cannot afford to pay for one out of his own pocket.

"The defendant is indigent and respectfully requests the appointment of counsel on appeal," read court papers filed by Murray in Los Angeles Superior Court yesterday. Murray said he wished to appeal both his conviction and his sentence but has not yet filed formal papers with the California appeals court. He is currently serving a four-year jail term.

Related
Timeline: The Trial of Dr. Conrad Murray
Photos: Michael Jackson Remembered
Photos: Michael Jackson's Funeral

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Vicious”

Lou Reed | 1972

Opening Lou Reed's 1972 solo album, the hard-riffing "Vicious" actually traces its origin back to Reed's days with the Velvet Underground. Picking up bits and pieces of songs from the people and places around him, and filing his notes for later use, Reed said it was Andy Warhol who provided fuel for the song. "He said, 'Why don't you write a song called 'Vicious,'" Reed told Rolling Stone in 1989. "And I said, 'What kind of vicious?' 'Oh, you know, vicious like I hit you with a flower.' And I wrote it down literally."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com