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Conor Oberst Rape Accuser: 'I Made Up Lies to Get Attention'

"I publicly retract my statements...and sincerely apologize to him...for writing such awful things," Joanie Faircloth writes in notarized statement

Conor Oberst.
Chris McKay/Getty Images
July 14, 2014 2:40 PM ET

Joanie Faircloth, who alleged that Bright Eyes frontman Conor Oberst had sexually assaulted her in the comments of an XOJane article, has now admitted that she made the whole story up. In February, Oberst had filed a libel lawsuit against her, calling her accusations "absolutely, unequivocally false." Now Faircloth is asking for forgiveness for what she wrote.

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"The statements I made and repeated online and elsewhere over the past six months accusing Conor Oberst of raping me are 100 percent false," she wrote in a notarized statement via Buzzfeed. "I made up those lies about him to get attention while I was going through a difficult period in my life and trying to cope with my son's illness. I publicly retract my statements about Conor Oberst and sincerely apologize to him, his family and his fans for writing such awful things about him. I realize that my actions were wrong and could undermine the claims of actual sexual assault victims and for that I also apologize. I'm truly sorry for all the pain that I caused."

A representative for Oberst said that the singer was on tour in Europe and was not immediately available for comment.

In February, the singer-songwriter requested that Faircloth recant her statement. "The only connection between Oberst and Faircloth was one of artist and fan – a fan who has posted laudatory comments about Oberst elsewhere online, including describing attending his band's concert as the 'Best memory ever,'" Oberst's lawyers wrote at the time.

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“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

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Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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