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Coldplay Won't Stream 'Mylo Xyloto'

The band's back catalog is still available on Spotify

October 26, 2011 6:25 PM ET
Chris Martin of Coldplay
Chris Martin of Coldplay
Stephen Lovekin/Getty Images

Coldplay have decided not to distribute their latest album Mylo Xyloto to streaming services such as Spotify, Rhapsody and Rdio, though they did allow for streams of songs from the new record through iTunes last week. The band have not offered any explanation for their decision.

"We always work with our artists and management on a case by case basis to deliver the best outcome for each release," the band's label EMI said in a statement. Nevertheless, sources close to the label have told CNET that they are not pleased with the band's decision, as these streaming services have had some success in bringing some listeners back into the habit of paying for music.

Though Coldplay are keeping their new record off of streaming services, their back catalog – along with the Mylo Xyloto single "Every Teardrop Is A Waterfall" – is currently available on Spotify, among other services.

Related
Readers' Poll: The 10 Best Coldplay Songs
Album Review: Coldplay - 'Mylo Xyloto'

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