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Coldplay, Springsteen Play Grammys

Tribute to Sly and the Family Stone another evening highlight

January 26, 2006 12:00 AM ET

Current three-time nominees Coldplay and five-time nominee Bruce Springsteen have been added to the performance lineup for the 48th Annual Grammy Awards, airing live from Los Angeles' Staples Center on CBS on February 8th.

Springsteen, who has already taken home twelve Grammys over the years, will battle it out with Martin and Co. for Best Rock Song (his "Devils & Dust" and their "Speed of Sound").

Other Grammy show highlights will include a special tribute to legendary funk outfit Sly and the Family Stone, with a musical salute from Maroon 5, Joss Stone, Black Eyed Peas' Will.I.Am, Aerosmith frontman Steven Tyler and guitarist Joe Perry, Robert Randolph, funk artist Devin Lima and John Legend, who is up for eight awards himself. The San Francisco band, headed by singer-songwriter, producer and multi-instrumentalist Sly Stone, are widely known for the Sixties and Seventies hits "I Want to Take You Higher," "Dance to the Music," "Family Affair" and "Everyday People."

Previously announced Grammy show performers include the pairings of Jamie Foxx and eight-time nominee Kanye West, on Record of the Year nominee "Gold Digger"; U2 and Mary J. Blige; country stars Faith Hill and Keith Urban; and Christina Aguilera and Herbie Hancock. Another eight-time nominee, diva Mariah Carey, is set to sing, joined by Brooklyn's Love Fellowship Tabernacle Church Choir.

 

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Song Stories

“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

Tag Team | 1993

Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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