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Coldplay, Dido Go to Roswell

Remixes, previously unreleased material featured on TV show's soundtrack

December 14, 2001 12:00 AM ET

Previously unreleased material from Coldplay, Dido, the Doves and others is slated for the soundtrack to the teen sci-fi drama Roswell. Due out February 26th, the album will include Dido's "Here With Me," the show's theme song, both in its original version and in a remix done by Dido's brother, Rollo, of the dance outfit Faithless.

The soundtrack also includes Coldplay's "Brothers and Sisters" and Ash's "Shining Light" (both previously unavailable in the U.S.), as well as Hybrid's remix of Sarah McLachlan's "Fear," a remix of Ivy's "Edge of the Ocean" and the Doves' cover the Beatles "Blackbird," which was recorded for the project.

The first single will be Sense Field's "Save Yourself," from the band's recently released, Tonight and Forever. The band is shooting a video for the single with Roswell actress Shiri Appleby in January.

Roswell track listing:

"Here With Me," Dido
"Save Yourself," Sense Field
"Edge of the Ocean (Duotone Mix)," Ivy
"Brothers and Sisters," Coldplay
"Shining Light," Ash
"Fear (Hybrid's Super Collider Mix)," Sarah McLachlan
"Destiny," Zero 7
"More Than Us," Travis
"I Shall Believe," Sheryl Crow
"Blackbird," the Doves
"Have a Nice Day," Stereophonics
"Here With Me (Chillin' With the Family Mix)," Dido

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