.

Coldplay Already Planning "Viva La Vida" Follow-Up For 2009?

August 21, 2008 1:50 PM ET

Coldplay's Viva La Vida or Death And All His Friends is barely two months old and already the band are aiming for a 2009 release for their next album. The sessions the band had with producer Brian Eno were so "incredibly fruitful," a source at Coldplay's label EMI said, that they recorded more music than a single album could house. "The majority of the follow-up is already in the can, though they will have to go back into the studio at some point to add a few more songs," the source told the U.K.'s Telegraph. So why the rush? The source speculates that after this upcoming album — which would be the band's fifth — could be combined with an obligatory greatest hits compilation to fulfill their contractual obligation to their label. Chris Martin has already hinted at a new record in 2009, saying it would be the likely destination of the band's collaboration with singer Kylie Minogue.

Related Stories:
Coldplay Debut Hype Williams, Anton Corbijn "Viva La Vida" Videos
Pemberton Day 3: Coldplay Joke Their Way Through Headlining Set
On the Charts: Coldplay's "Viva La Vida" Continues Big Sales Trend

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Money For Nothing”

Dire Straits | 1984

Mark Knopfler wrote this song with Sting, and it wasn’t without controversy. The Dire Straits frontman's original lyric used the word “faggot” to describe a singer who got their “money for nothing and their chicks for free.” Even though the slur was edited out in many versions, the band, and Knopfler, still took plenty of criticism for the term. “I got an objection from the editor of a gay newspaper in London--he actually said it was below the belt,” Knopfler told Rolling Stone. Still, "Money For Nothing," undoubtedly augmented by its innovative early computer-animated video, stayed at Number One for three weeks.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com