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Chris Brown Graduates from Domestic Violence Program and Asks to Lift Protective Order

Court order protecting Rihanna may be downgraded due to Brown's good behavior

January 31, 2011 12:05 PM ET
Chris Brown appears in court for a probation progress report hearing on January 28, 2011 in Los Angeles, California
Chris Brown appears in court for a probation progress report hearing on January 28, 2011 in Los Angeles, California
David McNew/Getty

Chris Brown will no longer be required to appear in court every three months now that he has completed a domestic violence education program. The R&B singer finished the year-long course in December as part of his sentencing for assaulting his ex-girlfriend Rihanna in 2009.

Photos: Rihanna and Chris Brown's Grammy Weekend: The Days and Hours Before the Infamous Fight


Brown is now asking Judge Patricia Schnegg to lift or downgrade a protective order requiring him to stay 50 yards away from Rihanna at all times, or 10 yards if they are both appearing at the same record industry event. Judge Schnegg is considering the request, but will consult with Rihanna's attorney before making a decision. If her lawyers approve, Brown's order is likely to be brought down to "level one, do not annoy" status.

Chris Brown passes a milestone, asks court to lift protective order [L.A. Times]

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