Chris Brown Asks Judge to Dismiss Assault Charge

Singer's lawyers say prosecutors misused grand jury process in preparation for upcoming trial

Chris Brown court
Lucy Nicholson-Pool\Getty Images
Chris Brown appears in court with his attorney.
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Lawyers representing beleaguered pop star Chris Brown have asked a judge to dismiss the misdemeanor assault charge, stemming from an alleged altercation with a man in Washington D.C. last year, The Associated Press reports. Brown's team filed a motion Wednesday, claiming prosecutors misused the grand jury process in preparation for trial. The prosecutors have yet to reply.

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Last October, D.C. police arrested Brown and his bodyguard after they allegedly punched a man asking for a photo outside a hotel. Brown was first charged with a felony, but it was later reduced to a misdemeanor. Since then, the singer checked himself into rehab to deal with his anger issues but was kicked out after throwing a rock through his mother's car window. He was later sentenced to another 90 days in rehab, with his parole for his 2009 assault on Rihanna revoked. Brown was released from rehab in March but was then jailed as a result of violating parole. He is expected to stay in jail through April 23rd, after a judge reportedly said Brown had an "inability to stay out of trouble."

In February, Parker Isaac Adams, the man he allegedly hit, filed a civil suit for $3 million against Brown and the bodyguard. He was seeking to recover his medical bills.

A March court report chronicling Brown's mental health issues said the singer could be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and bipolar disorder. "It is not uncommon for patients with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Bipolar II to use substances to self-medicate their biochemical mood swings and trauma triggers," it said. "Brown became aggressive and acted out physically due to his untreated mental health disorder, severe sleep deprivation, inappropriate self-medicating and untreated PTSD."