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Chief Keef Violated Probation With Pitchfork Gun Interview, Prosecutors Say

Authorities seek to send Chicago rapper back to jail

October 17, 2012 3:35 PM ET
Chief Keef
Chief Keef
Johnny Nunez/WireImage

Prosecutors argued today in a Chicago juvenile court that Chief Keef should go back to jail for violating his probation, pointing to a controversial Pitchfork video interview with the Chicago rapper at a gun range, the Chicago Sun Times reports. Keef is currently serving 18 months probation for pointing a gun at a Chicago police officer.

Cook County prosecutors say that because Keef can be seen with a gun in the Pitchfork video, he is violating probation conditions that prohibit him from having any firearms or illegal drugs or associating with gang members. Prosecutors also pointed to Keef's failure to earn a GED before a deadline set by his probation, and a September 30th incident when Chicago police found Keef with members of the Black Disciple gang while responding to a call of gang disturbance. Keef has another hearing scheduled for November 20th.

Chief Keef, real name Keith Cozart, was linked last month to the shooting death of rival teen rapper Lil Jojo, who was gunned down on a Chicago street. Immediately after Jojo's death, Keef tweeted taunting messages about the slain rapper.

Pitchfork last month pulled the Chief Keef gun range video interview in response to the Lil Jojo slaying and concerns about a wave of gun violence in Chicago, where the site is based.

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