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Chart Roundup: Sean "YouTube" Combs Takes Number One

October 25, 2006 3:23 PM ET

All that self-promoting video diary stuff didn't vault Diddy's new album into the wilds of super-awesome sales. Press Play only sold 170,483 copies in its first week on the charts, landing it a Number One debut but impressing few along the way. Shocking conclusion: Allowing your fans to watch you pee does not turn your record into a hit.

Meanwhile, Sting's collection of traditional lute music, Songs From the Labyrinth, jumped an impressive 12 spots on the charts this week, landing at Number 25, and mall-friendly pop tart Jo Jo (who has a somewhat sheepish but devoted following here at RS, we discovered in today's morning meeting) debuted at Number Three this week with her record High Road.

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Song Stories

“Road to Nowhere”

Talking Heads | 1985

A cappella harmonies give way to an a fuller arrangement blending pop and electro-disco on "Road to Nowhere," but the theme remains constant: We're on an eternal journey to an undefined destination. The song vaulted back into the news a quarter century after it was a hit when Gov. Charlie Crist used it in his unsuccessful 2010 campaign for the U.S. Senate in Florida. "It's this little ditty about how there's no order and no plan and no scheme to life and death and it doesn't mean anything, but it's all right," Byrne said with a chuckle.

More Song Stories entries »
 
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