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Chart Roundup: Sean "YouTube" Combs Takes Number One

October 25, 2006 3:23 PM ET

All that self-promoting video diary stuff didn't vault Diddy's new album into the wilds of super-awesome sales. Press Play only sold 170,483 copies in its first week on the charts, landing it a Number One debut but impressing few along the way. Shocking conclusion: Allowing your fans to watch you pee does not turn your record into a hit.

Meanwhile, Sting's collection of traditional lute music, Songs From the Labyrinth, jumped an impressive 12 spots on the charts this week, landing at Number 25, and mall-friendly pop tart Jo Jo (who has a somewhat sheepish but devoted following here at RS, we discovered in today's morning meeting) debuted at Number Three this week with her record High Road.

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Song Stories

“Vans”

The Pack | 2006

Berkeley, California rappers the Pack made their footwear choice clear in 2006 with the song "Vans." The track caught the attention of Too $hort, who signed them to his imprint. MTV refused to play the video for the song, though, claiming it was essentially a commercial for the product. Rapper Lil' B disagreed. "I didn’t know nobody [at] Vans," he said. "I was just a rapper who wore Vans." Even without MTV's support, Lil' B recognized the impact of the track. "God blessed me with such a revolutionary song… People around my age know who really started a lot of the dressing people are into now."

More Song Stories entries »
 
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