Charlie Worsham Gets Wise With Kix Brooks

Country wunderkind on listening to advice and being a "student of entertainment"

Charlie Worsham
Kevin Winter/Getty Images for Stagecoach
Charlie Worsham performs at Stagecoach in Indio, California
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Charlie Worsham has played on stages of all sizes. He's currently on Brad Paisley's Country Nation World Tour and later this year he'll join Kip Moore on the CMT On Tour 2014: Up in Smoke trek. During last night's CMT Awards, Worsham shared that his live show is undergoing a transformation.

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"I'm in this really cool place in my career, where the stage I'm on that night, whether it's the Paisley tour, the CMT tour, or a bar with 10 people in it, it is the most important show I've ever played in my life," he told Rolling Stone Country. "I go to the ends of my imagination to do something that's unforgettable every night. I feel like I am in turbo mode as a student of entertainment. I've been fortunate too to hang out a lot with some of my heroes and have been getting some great advice, getting to try their advice out onstage."

Among those offering the fast-fingered multi-instrumentalist some wisdom was Kix Brooks. The two crossed paths during a party at Sheryl Crow's home.

"I told him, 'Hey, you wrote the book on what I'm learning right now,'" recalls Worsham, whose debut album, Rubberband, was released last year to favorable reviews. "He said, 'Here's the thing. Success or no success, it doesn't matter. The biggest thing is that show you're playing and that song you're playing in that moment. Live in the moment and enjoy it because it goes by so fast.' Coming from a guy like that, that's pretty heavy. So I'm taking it to heart."

Worsham recently premiered a special performance of Rubberband track "Young to See" for the launch of Rolling Stone Country and shared memories of his first Music City digs, an almost musical commune. "My first place in Nashville was like Animal House," he said. "The whole band lived under one roof, and most nights the jam sessions ended close to sunrise."