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Carlos Santana to Publish Memoir in 2014

Miles Davis, B.B. King and Eric Clapton will figure in book

September 13, 2012 2:15 PM ET
Carlos Santana
Carlos Santana
Denise Truscello/WireImage

Carlos Santana is working on a still-untitled memoir that Little Brown is set to publish in English and Spanish in 2014, the Los Angeles Times reports. Santana hopes his story will "help readers discover the sanctity, grace and divinity in themselves," according to a press release the newspaper quotes. "This book is a testament to triumph, victory and success."

The book promises to include stories about some of the biggest names in music history from Miles Davis and B.B. King to Eric Clapton, Herbie Hancock and Harry Belafonte. The guitar great will also write about "some of the people who have had a divine influence on his life, such as Cesar Chavez, Dolores Huerta and Archbishop Desmond Tutu."

Readers should also expect some navel gazing if this part of the press release is any indication: "Being recognized by all who hear a single note is a God-given miracle. This gift has been bestowed on a select few: Bob Marley, John Lennon, Michael Jackson, Jimi Hendrix, John Coltrane, Alice Coltrane, Stevie Ray Vaughn, John McLaughlin and, of course, Carlos Santana."

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