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Carbon/Silicon's Mick Jones and Tony James Talk Ferris Bueller, Fascism; Plus Watch Three Live Songs

December 26, 2007 12:47 PM ET

"The great thing about the Internet is they don't know we're really old," joked Mick Jones, hanging backstage before a recent gig with his latest band, the file-sharing-friendly Carbon/Silicon. Click above to watch the onetime Clash guitarist and his Carbon/Silicon bandmate Tony James (formerly of Generation X) quote Ferris Bueller, explain how they've made it in the business for so long ("keep taking your medication") and discuss how the spirit of Seventies punk lives on today. "Music is a great way of raising debate," Jones says. "[Kids today] look back at the cool days, and some of those cool things were really good, like stand up against fascism."

Plus, here are three live performances from the Carbon/Silicon show at New York's Highline Ballroom:

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Song Stories

“Santa Monica”

Everclear | 1996

After his brother and girlfriend both died of drug overdoses, Art Alexakis -- depressed and hooked on drugs himself -- jumped off the Santa Monica Pier in California, determined to die. "It was really stupid," said the Everclear frontman, who would further explore his personal emotional journey in the song "Father of Mine." "I went under the water. Then I said, 'I don't wanna die.'" The song, declaring "Let's swim out past the breakers/and watch the world die," was intended as a manifesto for change, Alexakis said. "Let the world do what it's gonna do and just live on our own."

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