Canadian Artist Uses John Lennon Tooth Fragment in Sculpture

'This is like a time-capsule. It will contain his DNA'

Kristen Zuk, John, Lennon, Tooth, Sculpture, molar
Courtesy Image
Edmonton sculptor Kirsten Zuk working on her John Lennon DNA sculpture for her Art Show on August 18th in Alberta, Canada.
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A fragment of the John Lennon tooth that was auctioned off last fall will become part of a work of art, the Edmonton Sun reports. The tooth's winning bidder gave a small piece of the molar to his sister to use in a clay sculpture she was making in the Beatles legend's likeness.

The tooth, which had been in the family of John Lennon's former housekeeper for years, went to auction last November in Stockport, England. It was purchased for more than $32,000 by Michael Zuk, a dentist from Alberta who says he suggested that his sister use a fragment of the tooth in a work of art.

"This is like a time-capsule. It will contain his DNA," Kirsten Zuk told the Sun. (The tooth was actually too fragile to be DNA-tested before the sale to confirm it belonged to Lennon, but the Omega Auction House said they had no doubts regarding its authenticity.)

Zuk will display her sculpture of Lennon at the Edmonton, Alberta Fringe Festival. She is using the sculpture to promote the charity Smile Train, which helps provide cleft-palate surgery for children living in poverty.

 

John Lennon's molar sold at auction. (Photo: Courtesy of Omega Auction House)