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Cage the Elephant Find Their Style on 'Melophobia' -- Album Premiere

Check out the band's eclectic third LP

Cage The Elephant
Colin Lane
October 1, 2013 9:00 AM ET

After nearly five years of non-stop touring, Cage the Elephant’s took some time off -- and the downtime had a strange effect on vocalist Matthew Shultz."I just found myself doing life’s meaningless tasks to fill the void," he says. "I became obsessive compulsive about decorating my house and once that was finished, I felt obligated to spend time in each room. I’d be in the living room for a while and then I felt the need to spend time in the kitchen. Then, I’d move into the dining room and then into the bedroom as if it had some kind of purpose."

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This new found attention to detail carried over into the making of their third album Melophobia, as the band stopped listening to recorded music almost entirely in order to avoid influnces seeping in. "In the past, we would try to absorb as much music as possible and then we would interpret it however we saw fit," Shultz says. "This record felt like us allowing our own inherent style to come through."

Melophobia is out October 8th on RCA Records. Stream it below: 

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