.

Buffalo Springfield Drummer Dewey Martin Passes Away at 68

February 5, 2009 1:49 PM ET

Buffalo Springfield drummer Dewey Martin died February 1st of unknown causes. He was 68. Born Walter Milton Dwayne Midkiff, Martin cut his teeth in Nashville, playing with Patsy Cline, Roy Orbison and the Everly Brothers. He moved to L.A. in the mid-1960s and learned that a fledgling band was looking for a new drummer. The group's guitarist, Neil Young, was highly impressed by Martin during his audition in 1966. "He was a sensitive drummer," Young says in his biography Shakey. "You get harder, he hits harder. You pull back, he hits back. He can feel the music — you don't have to tell him." After his successful audition, Martin asked the group what their name was. "They went over and pulled out this sign, Buffalo Springfield," Martin later recalled. "I said, 'Great man, a steamroller. You got a heavy sound. Let's go for it.' "

During early Buffalo Springfield gigs Martin sang Wilson Pickett's "In The Midnight Hour," and on their second album he handled lead vocals on "Good Time Boy." He also sang background vocals on their biggest hit "For What It's Worth" — in addition to providing the LSD that he claimed inspired Stephen Stills to write the song.

The notoriously volatile band folded in 1968 after just three albums, but Martin attempted to solider with new members on as the New Buffalo Springfield. After a nasty legal battle with his former bandmates he changed the name to New Buffalo — but that group fizzled by the end of 1969. Martin largely fell off the musical map afterward and worked as an auto mechanic, but he resurfaced alongside former Buffalo Springfield bassist Bruce Palmer in the mid-1980s as part of Buffalo Springfield Revisited. Joined by new members, the original rhythm section played Buffalo Springfield classics on the oldies circuit before finally hanging it up in the early 1990s. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next
Around the Web
Powered By ZergNet
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Hungry Like the Wolf”

Duran Duran | 1982

This indulgent New Romantic group generated their first U.S. hit with the help of what was at the time new technology. "Simon [Le Bon] and I, I think, had been out the night before and had this terrible hangover," said keyboardist Nick Rhodes. "For some reason we were feeling guilty about it and decided to go and do some work." Rhodes started playing with his Jupiter-8 synth, and then "Simon had an idea for a lyric, and by lunchtime when everyone else turned up, we pretty much had the song." The Simmons drumbeat was equally important to the sound of "Hungry Like the Wolf," as Duran Duran drummer Roger Taylor stated it "kind of defined the drum sound for the Eighties."

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com