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Bruno Mars Will Perform at Super Bowl

Singer set to headline halftime show at New Jersey's MetLife Stadium

Bruno Mars performs during The BBC Radio Big Weekend Festival in Londonderry, Northern Ireland.
Ollie Millington/Redferns via Getty Images
September 8, 2013 1:20 PM ET

It's official: Bruno Mars is going to the Super Bowl. After rumors of the choice bubbled up on Saturday, Mars announced today that he will be headlining the Super Bowl XLVIII halftime show during an appearance in New York's Times Square for Fox's NFL Sunday broadcast. The NFL also confirmed through Twitter. The game will take place at the MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey on February 2nd, 2014. 

The 10 Best Super Bowl Halftime Shows

After making a splash with his performance and Best Male Video win at MTV's Video Music Awards, the 27-year-old Grammy-winner is set to join a storied list of halftime performers that includes the Rolling Stones, Madonna, Michael Jackson, Prince, and Bruce Springsteen. Beyoncé's performance at the last Super Bowl drew an audience of more than 110 million views, according to the Los Angeles Times.  

"It's just an honor," Mars said as the news was announced during Fox's live pregame show. "We just got off tour, so being able to come to New York City and announce this is incredible."

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