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Bruno Mars Embraces Dubstep in 'Locked Out of Heaven' (The M Machine Remix) - Song Premiere

Electro group rework pop hit into dance beat

The M Machine
Holy Mountain
January 18, 2013 8:00 AM ET

Click to listen to Bruno Mars' 'Locked Out of Heaven (The M Machine Remix)'

San Francisco electro trio the M Machine are gearing up for the February 19th release of their new EP, Metropolis Pt. Two, on OWSLA. They've also contributed a revamped version of Bruno Mars' "Locked Out of Heaven" to Jukebox, a remix album of cuts from Mars' album Unorthodox Jukebox, that is out January 21st.

Kicking up the track's sunny chorus a few notches, the M Machine turn "Locked Out of Heaven" into a certifiable club smash with a doozy of a dubstep drop when the chorus hits. "We did a secret show with Porter Robinson and Zedd at a tiny club in Santa Cruz, and on our drive back to San Francisco, we heard 'Locked Out of Heaven' for the first time on the radio," M Machine's Eric Luttrell tells Rolling Stone. "We all thought it was an awesome pop song. By total coincidence, when we got back to the studio, in our inbox was an offer to remix the track."

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