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Bruce Springsteen's Super Bowl Plans

Springsteen slated to play halftime show

Bruce Springsteen, Max Weinberg and Steve Van Zandt
Jordi Vidal/Redferns
October 16, 2008

Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band are set to perform during Super Bowl XLIII's halftime show on February 1st, 2009, in Tampa, Florida, Rolling Stone has learned. Springsteen will be the fifth veteran act in a row at the Super Bowl. Since Janet Jackson and Justin Timberlake's disastrous 2004 performance, the NFL has booked Paul McCartney, the Rolling Stones, Prince, and Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. The show has become the highest-profile gig in music – Petty and Prince both saw big sales bumps for their back catalogs after their hit-filled performances.

No plans have been announced, but the Super Bowl gig suggests an active 2009 for Springsteen and the E Street Band, who completed a world tour behind his Magic album in August. Producer Brendan O'Brien has said that unreleased songs remain from the Magic sessions, which could provide material for another album.

This story is from the October 16, 2008 issue of Rolling Stone.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

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