.

Brian Wilson at Work on New Solo Record

Former Beach Boy is recording with Jeff Beck, Al Jardine, David Marks and more

June 6, 2013 3:25 PM ET
Brian Wilson performs in Los Angeles, California.
Brian Wilson performs in Los Angeles, California.
Tommaso Boddi/WireImage

Brian Wilson is working on his 11th solo record at Los Angeles' Ocean Way Studios and is set to embark on a short tour this summer with fellow former Beach Boys Al Jardine and David Marks, Billboard reports. 

Jardine and Marks are also helping out on the album, along with famed session player and producer Don Was and guitarist Jeff Beck. According to a statement, Wilson had wanted to work with Beck since 2005, saying, "Jeff's incredible guitar playing is exactly what I want for my new album."

Brian Wilson on Another Beach Boys Reunion: 'Doubt It'

While Wilson released two albums of mostly covers in 2011 – In the Key of Disney and Brian Wilson Reimagines Gershwin – his current project marks his first LP of original material since 2008's That Lucky Old Sun.

Last year Wilson re-teamed with the Beach Boys for a new album That's Why God Made The Radio; after a successful 50th anniversary tour, however, Mike Love decided to continue touring as the Beach Boys, but without Wilson, Jardine and Marks, despite the trio's desire to keep going.

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“Whoomp! (There It Is)”

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Cecil Glenn — a.k.a., "D.C." — was a cook at Magic City, a nude dance club in Atlanta, when he first heard women shout "Whoomp — there it is!" Inspired by the party chant, he and partner Steve "Roll'n" Gibson wrote a song around it. Undaunted by label rejections, they borrowed $2,500 from Glenn's parents and pressed 800 singles, which quickly sold out in the Atlanta area. A record deal came soon after. Glenn said the song was meant for positive partying. "If you're going to say 'Whoomp there it is,' and you're doing something negative, we'd rather it not have come out of your mouth."

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