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Brandon Flowers Wound Up Over Misquoting of Killers' "Human"

November 19, 2008 9:05 AM ET

The Killers' Brandon Flowers continues to be frustrated by fans being frustrated with the lyrics to the chorus of his new single "Human." "Are we human, or are we dancer," Flowers sings, imploring that the ambiguous word is the grammatically-incorrect "dancer" and not "denser." "That sucks a bit. I don't like, 'Are we denser?' as an alternative," Flowers said. "I really care what people think but people don't seem to understand 'Human.' They think it's nonsense. But I was aching over those lyrics for a very long time to get them right." Part of that time aching was evidently spent reading books by Hunter S. Thompson, as Flowers himself has admitted the "dancer" line was inspired by the former Rolling Stone contributor. "It's taken from a quote by [author Hunter S.] Thompson," Flowers admitted last month when the confusion began. "'We're raising a generation of dancers,' and I took it and ran. I guess it bothers people that it's not grammatically correct, but I think I'm allowed to do whatever I want." The Killers' Day & Age is set to befuddle listeners with its lyrics on November 24th.

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Song Stories

“Bird on a Wire”

Leonard Cohen | 1969

While living on the Greek island of Hydra, Cohen was battling a lingering depression when his girlfriend handed him a guitar and suggested he play something. After spotting a bird on a telephone wire, Cohen wrote this prayer-like song of guilt. First recorded by Judy Collins, it would be performed numerous times by artists incuding Johnny Cash, Joe Cocker and Rita Coolidge. "I'm always knocked out when I hear my songs covered or used in some situation," Cohen told Rolling Stone. "I've never gotten over the fact that people out there like my music."

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