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Boy George Covers the Stooges in 'I Wanna Be Your Dog' - Song Premiere

Culture Club singer gives menacing take on punk classic

April 15, 2013 8:00 AM ET
Boy George
Boy George
Malcolm Garrett

Click to listen to Boy George's' 'I Wanna Be Your Dog'

Culture Club singer Boy George and Iggy Pop are an unusual combination, but the former has sharp teeth. In this cover of the Stooges' "I Wanna Be Your Dog," George gives a startlingly menacing take on the classic track. Though the original drove forward with a searing riff, cacophonous drums and Iggy's gritty, deliberate vocals, George turns the song into an increasingly sinister plot. Vicious strings swoop over George's dark vocals while the mid-tempo drums stay out of way, creating a theatrical and shadowy atmosphere.

Boy George Covers Lana Del Rey's 'Video Games'

Boy George's cover of "I Wanna Be Your Dog" will be on British Electric Foundation's compilation Dark: Music of Quality and Distinction Vol. 3, the first installment in the cover series since 1992. It's set for a May 27th release.

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