.

Boston Cops Crack Down on Moshing

Aggressive dancing at Flogging Molly gig leads to citation for House of Blues

March 14, 2012 9:50 AM ET
mosh pit
Music fans create a "mosh pit" during a music festival.
Simone Joyner/Getty Images

Boston police are cracking down on moshing and slam-dancing at concerts in the city. Cops have cited an incident at a Flogging Molly show at the House of Blues on February 21st for a license violation, noting that 60 concertgoers engaged in "aggressive mosh pit dance," which resulted in people colliding into one another and getting knocked to the floor. This activity – which is pretty much par for the course at hardcore punk and metal gigs – violated safety rules, and the club was cited because security did not intervene.

"The safety of our patrons is the top priority," the House of Blues said in a statement. Representatives of the venue say they are working with city officials to "address concerns about moshing and other forms of expressive dance."

Photos: Random Notes

"Dancing is a First Amendment right, but the behavior itself is a violation, especially when it becomes dangerous and a public safety hazard," Boston police spokeswoman Officer Nicole Grant told the Boston Herald. The city of Boston addressed the topic after a City Hall hearing yesterday, while the House of Blues was ordered to put up illuminated signs throughout the venue declaring that moshing is not allowed.

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