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Borgore Parties With Waka Flocka Flame on 'Wild Out' - Song Premiere

Check out the DJ-producer's blaring new single, which also features Paige

BORGORE
Alexander Federic
October 7, 2013 9:00 AM ET

Israeli DJ-producer Borgore has a knack for stitching together eclectic styles. As a former death-metal drummer, he brings a hard-hitting approach to his electronic tunes – but he's still savvy enough to collaborate with artists of very different genres. On his new single, "Wild Out," he brings both a pop singer, Paige, and a rapper, Waka Flocka Flame, into the fold.

Hear Borgore Taps Into Rock & Roll Excess in 'Legend' 

"What the fuck you hatin' for?" sings Paige over blaring electro-bass drops and Euro-house synths. "Give me a round of applause!" Check out an exclusive stream of the track below.

Borgore had high praise for her, as well as for his guest rapper. "Working with Waka was like working with the energy of an MMA fight, while Paige brought a serene, silky, angel-like voice and I had to somehow mix them both together. Mission."

"Wild Out" will be released on October 15th, on Dim Mak Records, and it's available for pre-order on iTunes and Borgore's official website. The Wild Out EP will be released later this fall.

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