Bootstraps: The Glory, The Grandeur & The Dandy Music

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Though they don’t have a plethora of live gigs under their belt, or a frenzied following of manic fans trading performance tapes and videos, Bootstraps, still a very young band, are positioned enviably nonetheless.

They are very good and only getting better.

The L.A.-based group, who recently released their self-titled debut album on the revamped (and consistently tasteful) Harvest Records label, aren’t actually starting from scratch. Like many of today’s more interesting artists, they’ve been getting prime exposure via placement on TV and film song placements (Parenthood, Elementary, Grey’s Anatomy, Private Practice, etc.), a route that allows them much more artistic freedom than the confines of 2014 radio and also nets them a wider berth of potential fans.

And if just a fraction of those who heard their music via those TV and film placements pick up the new Bootstraps album, everyone wins.

Ultimately the work of singer/songwriter Jordan Beckett—a Portland native who moved to L.A. for potential screenwriting opportunities— Bootstraps officially started when Beckett put together some music for Take Me Home, the 2011 directorial debut of friend Sam Jaeger, and amassed a group of players who might perform it live.

Considering that origin, you wouldn’t be alone in wondering why Bootstraps sound so fully formed and lived-in with their music. Their debut album has a voice, feel and atmosphere that bands who’ve been around years longer will clearly envy.

In the Yahoo Music studios recently to perform a few tracks and talk about their music, Bootstraps offered up some compelling, emotionally gripping material, and provided further evidence that they’re absolutely a band worth watching closely.

Consisting of Jordan Beckett (vocals & guitar), David Quon (guitar and backing vocals), Chris Jaymes (keyboards), Mathew Aveiro (Drums) and Carl Jordan (bass), the band was tight, tasteful, and absolutely in control. Keep an eye on Bootstraps.