.

Bono Will Ask Lawmakers to Spare Aid Programs

U2 singer meeting with Congress, Obama officials to make case

November 12, 2012 8:35 AM ET
bono
Bono attends (RED) And Beats By Dr. Dre Kick Off (RED) RUSH TO ZERO Campaign at Beats By Dr. Dre Store in New York.
Gary Gershoff/Getty Images for (RED)

Bono will urge U.S. lawmakers not to cut U.S. foreign assistance programs when the U2 singer and anti-poverty activist visits Washington this week, Reuters reports. Bono will make his case to members of Congress and the Obama administration, who must reach a budget deal to avoid $600 million worth of spending cuts and tax increases, known as the "fiscal cliff," that would take effect early next year.

Bono will make an appeal to spare development assistance, according to a spokeswoman for his ONE Campaign, arguing that U.S. programs that fund treatment for HIV/AIDS patients, nutrition programs for malnourished children and emergency food aid help to save tens of millions of lives in impoverished nations while representing just one percent of the U.S. budget.

The singer will also talk today with students at Georgetown University about the power of social movements, and meet with World Bank President Jim Yong Kim Wednesday for a webcast discussion about the challenges of eradicating poverty.

To read the new issue of Rolling Stone online, plus the entire RS archive: Click Here

prev
Music Main Next

blog comments powered by Disqus
Daily Newsletter

Get the latest RS news in your inbox.

Sign up to receive the Rolling Stone newsletter and special offers from RS and its
marketing partners.

X

We may use your e-mail address to send you the newsletter and offers that may interest you, on behalf of Rolling Stone and its partners. For more information please read our Privacy Policy.

Song Stories

“Bizness”

Tune-Yards | 2011

The opening track to Merrill Garbus’ second album under the Tune-Yards banner (she also plays in the trio Sister Suvi), “Bizness” is a song about relationships that is as colorful as the face paint favored by Garbus both live and in her videos. Disjointed funk bass, skittering African beats, diced-and-sliced horns and Garbus’ dynamic voice, which ranges from playful coos to throat-shredding howls, make “Bizness” reminiscent of another creative medium. “I'd like for them not to be songs as much as quilts or collages or something,” Garbus said.

More Song Stories entries »
 
www.expandtheroom.com