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Bone Thugs-N-Harmony's 'Flesh-N-Bone' Creating Medical Marijuana Strain

'Phifty Caliber Kush' now available to patients in Michigan

March 20, 2013 1:20 PM ET
Flesh-N-Bone, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony
Flesh-N-Bone of Bone Thugs-N-Harmony.
Allen Berezovsky/Getty Images

Taking cross-branding to new highs, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony member Stanley "Flesh-N-Bone" Howse has partnered with a medical marijuana facility in Otisville, Michigan, to create a new strain for patients in the area, Michigan Live reports.

"We worked closely together to figure out what we wanted out of the medication," said Anthony Butler, owner of the Green Oasis dispensary. The partnership will also allow Butler to further cultivate and distribute the strain and its seeds.

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"It's almost unreal," Butler added. "It's definitely an honor."

Dubbing the strain "Phifty Caliber Kush," Butler said it has a distinct floral taste and works as an effective pain reliever: "It's the best of the best," he said.

The budding relationship between Howse and Butler – which may be the first of its kind – came about after the owner of a company that specializes in marijuana-themed clothes (which Butler used to work for) put the two in contact following a discussion about who might like to get involved in the medical marijuana industry.

Michael "Tony B." Bernardi, executive of business affairs for Flesh-N-Bone Global, said that Howse hopes the new strain can provide relief for qualified patients and he's proud to be a part of a "paradigm shift in the culture" of medicinal marijuana. The Green Oasis may also start selling merchandise and it's possible Howse might visit the dispensary in the future.

While medicinal marijuana is legal in Michigan, the state's Supreme Court recently issued a ruling that allowed the state to shut down a dispensary for violating public health code. Michigan Attonrey General Bill Schuette said that the decision would further let the state close other facilities on the grounds they are a public nuisance.

In response to that interpretation, Butler has started charging only enough to reimburse the cost of growing the plant and sells only to patients he serves as a registered caregiver, leading to calls from bill collectors and keeping him from serving other patients in need. "I've seen my medicine help cancer patients, people with asthma," Butler said.

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